2021 Work Plan Overview

Our 2021 work plan has been released Read on to learn the details

The Board has developed and approved a work plan for 2021. Below is a summary:

  • Prevention
    • Continuing support, through C-OFOKLA, of the boat steward program, CCStoptheInvasion.org
    • Support updating and improving the boat decontamination station at Dwyer Park
  • Monitoring
    • Monitor the lake through CSLAP
    • Expand the monitoring by developing a macrophyte monitoring program with Soil & Water (SWCD)
  • Treatments (see proposed treatment area)
    • Treat variable leaf milfoil in previously untreated areas, focusing on clearing it from “seed” areas.
    • Expand starry stonewort treatments
    • Explore treating pondweed in highly congested sections
  • Management
    • Support SWCD shorescaping program
    • Continue support of septic education program
    • Participate in the Tioughnioga River LWRP Update project
  • Organizational
    • Continue to build community
    • Maintain the lake management plan

You can view the full work plan here.

In addition to ongoing lake management activities, the Board is planning to pursue a treatment program targeting variable leaf milfoil (VLM), starry stonewort (SSW) and pondweed. We will follow our standard process for treatments:

  • Develop a detailed plan and budget
  • File for a permit in late January/early February
  • Notify all riparian owners by mail of our intent to treat and approximate dates
  • Conduct a public meeting to discuss any concerns
  • Raise money to cover the treatments
  • Complete the treatments

One of the key benefits of our treatment program over the past two years is the reduced amount of milfoil floating on the lake. We are asking everyone to donate to support the cost of treatment. We will also work with Soil and Water for financial support once budgets have been finalized.

If you have any questions, comments or suggestions please email us at [email protected]

Work Plan Review 2020

In spite of Covid restrictions, 2020 was a very active season for LYLPS. We completed most of the items in our work plan (published here) including successful treatments of variable leaf milfoil and starry stonewort.

The following table shows our results vs our plan:

Plan

Results

·       Prevention

o   Support the installation and roll-out of the boat decontamination station at Dwyer Park

o   Continuing support, through C-OFOKLA, of the boat steward program, CCStoptheInvasion.org

·       The boat station was successfully installed and operated. The boat steward program was operational through the year.

·       Community educational programs were put on hold due to pandemic restrictions.

·       Monitoring

o   Monitor the lake through CSLAP

o   Conduct regional CSLAP training on May 8th

o   Expand the monitoring by joining the Finger Lakes PRISM macrophyte program

 

·       We successfully conducted our 8 CSLAP sessions, reporting data to the state-wide program.

·       We were unable to conduct regional training due to the pandemic.

·       Similarly, the PRISM macrophyte program was put on hold. However, we were able to conduct a macrophyte survey in conjunction with SWCD.

·       Treatments

o   Treat variable leaf milfoil (VLM) in previously untreated areas

o   Test treating starry stonewort (SSW)

 

·       We successfully treated VLM in previously untreated areas and conducted a test treatment of starry stonewort. VLM treatment went very well and the 2019 treatment seems to have had a lasting effect.

·       SSW treatment seemed positive and we will learn more next summer.

·       Management

o   Support new drawdown permit process

o   Establish shorescaping program in collaboration with SWCD

o   Continue support of septic education program

 

·       A new drawdown permit was issued and implemented in the fall. We have supported monitoring of the lake levels to assist compliance with the permit.

·       We did not make progress on the shorescaping program.

·       Septic workshops are not feasible under pandemic restrictions.

·       Organizational

o   Continue to build community

o   Maintain the lake management plan

·       We have continued to develop community and engage volunteers including with a Zoom social hour and several community Zoom meetings.

·       We are actively referencing the lake management plan as we move forward to next year.

Fall Meeting Saturday 9/19 at 10:00 a.m.

We’ve had a busy summer at Little York Lake and now is the time to review what we’ve accomplished and begin to plan for 2021.

Please join us Saturday, 9/19, at 10:00 a.m. either in person at the main pavilion (CRT) or via Zoom. We are limited to 50 people in person and we will only send the Zoom link to registrants, so you must pre-register to attend. Please click on this link and complete the form.

We are also collecting dues of $50 for our 2020/21 membership year. There are 3 easy ways to pay:

  • Send a check to P.O. Box 56, Little York, NY 13087
  • Pay online at littleyorklake.com
  • Bring your payment to the meeting on the 19th

We need your support to continue our efforts at improving the lake.

Macrophyte Survey In Progress

If you see a boat out on the lake today or tomorrow driving, stopping and then driving again with some people throwing something over the side at each stop, they’re not crazy. It is the Cortland County SWCD conducting a macrophyte survey of Little York Lake.

Macrophytes are the plants and algae that occupy the lake. We often refer to them as “weeds.” Some are native and some are invasive, particularly the variable leaf milfoil and the starry stonewort. We’re trying to remove or control the invasives and let the native plants reassert control.

Samples are being taken at 50 meter interavals in a grid pattern covering the entire lake. A double sided rake is thrown over the side of the boat, hauled up, and the “catch” examined, identified and documented. Goodale Lake, feeding into Little York Lake, has been mapped as well. 

The macrophyte survey will produce a map showing us what plants we have and where they are located. Combined with work that LYLPS has done in past years, this will give us a road map to navigate our management plans. 

The survey is being funded by a grant from the Finger Lakes PRISM to Cortland SWCD with support and input from LYLPS. Thanks to our boat captain volunteers: Lindy Vangeli, Dean and Gerri-Ann Hartnett, Don Fisher and Jarrett Regard plus our mappers, Kathy McGrath and Hannah Whalen. And thanks to Amanda Barber for securing the grant.

 

Starry Stonewort Treatment 7/17

Our treatment for Starry Stonewort has been scheduled for Friday morning, July 17th with a rain date of July 24th. Riparian owners will receive notifications by U.S. Mail as well. The treatment area is outlined in this map as areas E,F and G.

Starry Stonewort

The only water use restriction during this treatment is for drinking water. We will be conducting water testing following the treatment (as we do for every treatment) and will update the community when this restriction is removed. Note that lake water should never be used as drinking water in any case.

Solitude Lake Management is performing the treatment for us using Captain XTR.

If you have any questions or concerns, email us at [email protected]

HAB Update

Saturday DEC confirmed that our water sample from the cove adjacent to Elm Street contained a harmful algae bloom (HAB). We are still waiting on details from the lab to determine the specifics of the organism, its toxicity and treatment.
Harmful Alagal Bloom on Little York Lake
 
Detailed information on HABs is contained on this DEC page. The map identifying all recent HAB reports is available here. There are images attached to the report in addition to the one in this post (click to view full-sized).
 
Until we have more details and an action plan (in the next few days) we strongly urge everyone to avoid contact with the water in that area of the lake (see the map). 
 
In the meantime, if you see anything that looks unusual, please email a picture to [email protected] or text it to 607-218-2550.
 
Area potentially with HABs
 
 

Potential for Harmful Algae Blooms in the Lake

We have had two dogs suddenly die after exposure to the lake. Both dogs were in the same area of the lake, along the south-western section of Elm Avenue (see map).

Area potentially with HABs

LYLPS board members along with the director of NYSFOLA inspected the area on Monday afternoon looking for evidence of blue-green algae (cyanobacteria). These bacteria are responsible for harmful algae blooms (HABs). HABs can make people ill, but they can kill dogs.

The following information comes from Webmd:

The algae produce two different toxins: one that causes neurological problems, and one that leads to liver failure, according to David Dorman, a professor of toxicology at North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine.

Signs that a dog has ingested blue-green algae include twitching, weakness, seizures, vomiting, and diarrhea. Although it is more common to see symptoms within minutes or hours, it might be days before the toxins take effect.

Blue-green algae are commonly confused with green algae — both can create dense material on the water’s surface that can interfere with activities like swimming and fishing, and may have a similar smell, the Environmental Protection Agency says. But, unlike green algae, blue-green algae can be fatal.

You can read the full article here: https://pets.webmd.com/dogs/news/20190814/toxic-algae-kills-dogs-across-the-country

During our inspection we did not see anything that looked like blue-green algae, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t present in the lake. We took a sample of an unusual material floating on the surface in the suspect area and will have an evaluation in the next few days. We are also waiting for an autopsy from the second dog.

Unfortunately, other than avoiding them, there is not much that can be done about them, though research in how to eliminate them has been ramped up in recent years. For now, it is important for everyone to stay vigilant and alert LYLPS if you see anything that looks like a HAB by emailing location and hopefully a picture to [email protected] or texting 607-218-2550.

View images of various types of algae blooms here so that you know if there is something you should report. You can review additional information on the DEC main HABs page here.

For the time being we recommend that people avoid using the lake in the affected area until we get additional information. We will post an update as soon as possible, hopefully around mid-week.

Treatment begins 6/18 at 10 a.m.

Signs are posted and the weather looks good for the first of our planned lake treatments. On Thursday morning we are treating the variable leaf milfoil. Treatment is scheduled to begin at approximately 10 a.m. and should take a few hours.

While there are minimal water use restrictions, we are asking boaters to stay off the lake during the treatment period. 

Check back here and we will post when the treatment is completed.

Community Q&A on 5/20

As mentioned in our last email, we are planning a community Q&A session on Wednesday, May 20th at 7 p.m. Due to ongoing restrictions we will hold the meeting using a Zoom call. 

Please register for the meeting by clicking here. Note, we will send the Zoom invitation to registrants at 5 p.m. on the 20th. This invitation will include a phone number if you prefer to listen.

We continue to make progress on collecting donations and preparing for our treatment, but we need all the support we can get. If you haven’t already, please visit littleyorklake.com/beattheweeds and make your donation today.